Incorrect notifications issued by IPONZ/WIPO

A number of New Zealand trade mark owners have recently received incorrect notifications in relation their International Registrations designating New Zealand (“IRNZ”).  The Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (“IPONZ”) advise these incorrect notifications appear to be the result of a “system issue” concerning communications with the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) who are responsible

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known

The sentence above is a quote from a journalist, Sharon Begley, in an article interviewing the astronomer, Carl Sagan, and is often misattributed to him.  How does it apply to patent searching?  You’re the one with an idea for the incredible something, and you will want it known, but as I often see, just because

Recent Changes to New Zealand Trade Mark Law

Trade mark owners should be aware of recent amendments to the New Zealand Trade Marks Act 2002 (TM Act), introduced under the Regulatory Systems (Economic Development) Amendment (No.2) Act.  These changes, which came into effect on 13 January 2020, are summarised below.   Renewal Grace Period The grace period to renew a New Zealand trade

How New Zealand patent applicants can beat the 13 February 2020 fee hike

On 13 February 2020, the Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (IPONZ) will increase many of its fees – and add several new ones.  As with any fee hike, some are justified more easily than others, some are “idiosyncratic” – and importantly, within the context of this article, some are avoidable altogether.   Specifically, if

New Zealand “best practice” further influenced by impending rise in official fees

The notion of what constitutes “best practice” when it comes to prosecuting a New Zealand patent application has always been somewhat subjective.  For every move that seems like a good idea, there’s usually a decent counterpoint.  However, we have recently attempted to reconcile all the pros and cons – and came to the conclusion that

Divisional patent practice in New Zealand – protecting an endangered species

Across most jurisdictions, the facility to file a divisional application is an essential part of a patent attorney’s toolkit.  It is also an avenue of potential strategic advantage to patent applicants.  As Trans-Tasman patent attorneys, we’re presently seeing the two jurisdictions we service move further and further apart in respect of divisional practice.  Australia remains

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