Software Patents in Australia: Hope in a High Court Appeal

Recently, we posted some commentary on a recent decision[1] (the RPL decision) on software patents by the Full Court of the Federal Court of Australia (FCAFC).  In short: the FCAFC set out new principles for determining patentability of computer-implemented inventions in Australia.  This test, on our interpretation, involves an initial assessment of whether the substance

New Zealand hits ‘Go’ on new Patent law

In late August 2013 the New Zealand Patents Bill passed its final reading in Parliament. When it comes into effect, anticipated to be around a year away, it will make sweeping changes to New Zealand patent law across the board. In our article of last week, we introduced the new Act and some of the

NZ’s new Patents Act 2013 – a ban on software patents “as such” and an expansion of the novelty requirement

On 28 August 2013, New Zealand’s new patents legislation was passed by a clear majority of the House of Representatives. Arguably, the most significant changes in the Patents Act 2013 are an effective ban on software patents and the expansion of the “local novelty” requirement. Although the changes will not take effect for at least a

Software patents: You’ll know one when you see it

In? Out? Either way, talk of software patents has dominated discussion of the New Zealand Patents Bill for several years, causing unfortunate delay for a much needed update to New Zealand patent law. However, resolution may be on the horizon. Following fierce lobbying by many in the New Zealand IT sector, the Government has announced

Progress toward New Zealand’s new Patents Act: End of year report card

As readers will know, New Zealand patent law has been in the throes of reform for the best part of a decade. The original exposure draft of the Patents Bill was released in 2004 – and since that time, we’ve penned a series of very similar articles, each entitled something along the lines of “Progress

Three versions in two weeks: NZ refines its proposed software patent exclusion (again)

When it rains, it pours. Following several years in which “progress” was a somewhat subjective term in respect of New Zealand’s patent law reforms, the Government has again shown that they now mean business.   Previously, we mentioned that the Patents Bill 2008 was finally being prioritised by the Government, seemingly as the result of an “innovation drive”.

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