The CPTPP has been signed – no United States and “IP Lite”

The “CPTPP”, otherwise known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership is what remains of the “TPPA-11” (which was itself, what remained of the  Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) Free Trade Agreement following the withdrawal of the United States).  Earlier today (8 March 2018), in Santiago, Chile, the eleven remaining signatories put pen to paper

The CPTPP places IP in the “too hard basket”

The “CPTPP”, otherwise known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership is what remains of the “TPPA-11” (which was itself, what remained of the  Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) Free Trade Agreement following the withdrawal of the United States).  Last month, in Vietnam, the eleven remaining signatories resolved to push forward toward an agreement –

IP implications for New Zealand’s General Election on 23 September 2017

New Zealanders head to the polls on 23 September 2017.  IP is very seldom a kingmaker when it comes to choosing a Government and readers will be unsurprised to learn that it has registered barely a blip on the radar throughout the present campaign.  Notwithstanding, this article briefly considers whether there is likely to be

The curious case of IP and the “TPPA-11”

The “TPPA-11” is what remains of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) Free Trade Agreement following the withdrawal of the United States.  Because the TPP was never ratified prior to US withdrawal, some have termed it the “zombie” TPP.  Despite the absence of the US, there remains a strong resolve amongst the TPPA-11 to realise economic benefits

Another reason to file early in New Zealand – the time-restricted, self-colliding, poisonous divisional

New Zealand’s new Patents Act 2013 takes effect from 13 September 2014.  There are compelling reasons to file prior to this date to take advantage of the existing laws, and these reasons have been outlined here.  Even so, it is worth making further mention of the New Zealand legislature’s efforts to modify the provisions for

New Zealand – the Patents Bill versus the irresistible force versus the immovable object

Patent law reform in New Zealand has been going on for more than a decade. However, as of today, New Zealand patent law remains codified by a 1953 Act, itself heavily borrowed from a 1949 UK Act. This means that New Zealand businesses – and overseas entities wishing to do business in New Zealand are governed by legislation that

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