The CPTPP places IP in the “too hard basket”

The “CPTPP”, otherwise known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership is what remains of the “TPPA-11” (which was itself, what remained of the  Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) Free Trade Agreement following the withdrawal of the United States).  Last month, in Vietnam, the eleven remaining signatories resolved to push forward toward an agreement –

The curious case of IP and the “TPPA-11”

The “TPPA-11” is what remains of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) Free Trade Agreement following the withdrawal of the United States.  Because the TPP was never ratified prior to US withdrawal, some have termed it the “zombie” TPP.  Despite the absence of the US, there remains a strong resolve amongst the TPPA-11 to realise economic benefits

Another reason to file early in New Zealand – the time-restricted, self-colliding, poisonous divisional

New Zealand’s new Patents Act 2013 takes effect from 13 September 2014.  There are compelling reasons to file prior to this date to take advantage of the existing laws, and these reasons have been outlined here.  Even so, it is worth making further mention of the New Zealand legislature’s efforts to modify the provisions for

Patent law change in New Zealand – Five reasons to act now!

New Zealand’s new Patents Act 2013 commences on 13 September 2014 and introduces higher patentability standards as well as increased official fees. A PCT national phase entry or a Paris Convention complete application filed in New Zealand before 13 September 2014 will be examined under the current, less stringent provisions and will be subject to lower official fees during prosecution.

NZ’s new Patents Act 2013 – a ban on software patents “as such” and an expansion of the novelty requirement

On 28 August 2013, New Zealand’s new patents legislation was passed by a clear majority of the House of Representatives. Arguably, the most significant changes in the Patents Act 2013 are an effective ban on software patents and the expansion of the “local novelty” requirement. Although the changes will not take effect for at least a

New Zealand – the Patents Bill versus the irresistible force versus the immovable object

Patent law reform in New Zealand has been going on for more than a decade. However, as of today, New Zealand patent law remains codified by a 1953 Act, itself heavily borrowed from a 1949 UK Act. This means that New Zealand businesses – and overseas entities wishing to do business in New Zealand are governed by legislation that

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